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Other W-2 Income

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Last updated: 23 Nov, 2018
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By Jason Watson ()
Posted November 23, 2018

You might not reap all the benefits of an S Corp election and subsequent self-employment tax savings if you have other W-2 income. Let’s say you are an IT consultant for ABC Company, and you also do some outside consulting. If ABC Company pays you $140,000 in wages, you are already max’ing out your Social Security contributions, and therefore any supplementary income regardless of your entity will automatically avoid additional Social Security taxes. You still obtain a small savings in Medicare taxes, which can be material.

We find this to very common among medical professions. Many times a surgeon or anesthesiologist will be full-time for a hospital or medical group, but also moonlight on the side for smaller towns with smaller hospitals with even smaller budgets.

The problem with piling extra W-2 salary from your S corporation onto W-2 salary from your main job is the S Corp’s portion of payroll taxes. While both salaries might exceed your individual Social Security cap ($132,900 in 2019), any salary in excess will unnecessarily increase the tax burden of your S Corp by 6.2% (the employer portion of Social Security taxes). Huh?

In other words, your main job will stop collecting and paying Social Security taxes once you reach the annual limit. However, since Social Security taxes are paid by both the employee (you) and the business, when you run payroll with your S corporation, the business will collect and pay Social Security taxes just like your main job. On your individual tax return you will get your excess refunded to you on Line 71 of Form 1040. That’s the good news. The bad news is that the S Corp’s portion will not be refunded. This is lost forever.

Here is yet another table to explain this further-

Salary from Main Job

150,000

Income from Business

200,000

Medicare Tax w/o S Corp

7,600

 -

Salary

66,000

 -

Payroll Tax w/ S Corp

  ER Social Security

4,092

  ER Medicare

957

  EE Medicare w/ Surtax

1,551

  Total Payroll Taxes w/ S Corp

6,600

 -

Initial Savings

1,000

(7,600 less 6,600)

 -

Fees for Payroll, Tax Prep (typical)

1,500

 -

Net Savings (loss)

-500

Ok… here we go. Let’s say you had a main job that earned $150,000 and you also run an online retailer business where you plan to make $200,000 net income after expenses. You eclipsed your Social Security maximum with your main job salary, so the $200,000 is only subjected to Medicare taxes plus the surtax, or $7,600 ($200,000 x 3.8%).

Now we elect S Corp for your business and pay a salary of $66,000. The total taxes paid not considering your portion of Social Security which will be refunded is $6,600. ER is short-hand for “employer” and EE refers to “employee.” The initial savings is $1,000. However, now you have to run payroll and file a corporate tax return. Therefore, the savings are gobbled up by normal professional fees.

So, in this situation perhaps a garden-variety LLC is more prudent from a cost-benefit and headache analysis. Having other W-2 income, however, could actually work in your favor- more on that later.

Sidebar: Having multiple sources of income can mess up your withholdings. Each source of income on its own withheld correctly, but when combined, the total income was in a higher tax bracket and unfortunately under-withheld. Again, payroll tables don’t know about other jobs or sources of income, and can only make assumptions. Some tax planning is a must. More about tax planning within your S corporation payroll in a later chapter.

Here is an internal table that we use during business consultations-

28% Salary

33% Salary

salary

28.0%

33.0%

ER social security

6.2%

6.2%

forfeited tax

1.7%

2.0%

 -

k-1 income

72.0%

67.0%

medicare

3.8%

3.8%

medicare savings

2.7%

2.5%

 -

delta

1.0%

0.5%

 -

net biz income

200,000

275,000

200,000

275,000

salary

56,000

77,000

66,000

90,750

forfeited tax*

3,472

4,774

4,092

5,627

medicare savings

5,472

7,524

5,092

7,002

 -

delta

2,000

2,750

1,000

1,375

Tilt. We have four scenarios; salaries of 28% and 33%, and business incomes of $200,000 and $275,000. Let’s take one and quickly dissect it.

The forfeited tax is your S Corp’s portion of Social Security taxes that must be paid, but cannot be refunded. This is 28% x 6.2% or 1.7%. This 28% will be meaningful once we get into the Section 199A deduction.

The Medicare savings is the remaining S Corp income that will now avoid this tax. This is 72% x 3.8% of 2.7%. The 72% is in the inverse of the salary percentage.

The first delta is simply the forfeited tax less the Medicare savings, or 1.0%. The second delta is the calculated savings and it ties out to the first delta since $200,000 x 1.0% is $2,000.

Ok, enough of that nonsense.

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